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Surprised but Pleased
Growing up in Arkansas my grandmother taught me to call a spade a spade -- she liked to play poker – but her intention was to remind me that you always tell the truth even when it hurts. This is a reference to her practice of requiring me to select my own switch from her yard when I did something bad. Well that’s the way I feel about President Trump this morning. I have been dumping on him for months, complaining about everything he did and said.
 
Last night the President surprised me. I don’t know if the strategy he has laid out for South Asia will work. Knocking down a hornets’ nest in Pakistan might certainly sting us more than the strategy anticipates. But it was a bold move, and may turn out to be one of the necessary steps in achieving some forward movement. I would certainly like to be a fly on the wall in Islamabad about now. I’ve got my fingers crossed.
 
Especially important to me was the part of the presentation when President Trump admitted his instincts had been wrong on Afghanistan. As best as I can tell it is the first time he has done something like that on anything. Some may label it a flip flop, but I disagree. His admission suggests to me that he has accepted that he can’t do it all himself. He needs help. I also see hints that he has begun to realize there is a limit on how much he can delegate to others. Anything requiring a change of direction -- in this case a strategy, can only be made by the President. That’s not micromanaging. It is what Presidents do. They set goals and objectives. Subordinates prepare a detailed plan requiring Presidential approval. Trying to tell the experts how to implement the details is where the micromanaging comes in.
 
It was also the first change in direction that signaled an orderly national security policy existed in this White House. I think we have General Kelly, the National Security Advisor, and the Secretary of Defense to thank. Kudos to all. Past history suggests for them this may rank as one of their greatest accomplishments. I’m especially pleased that the President listened to the people around him who know what they are doing. Now, if he would only give the State Department something to do, we would be getting closer to a return to a normal way of formulating national security policy. Good.
 
Just saying.
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My Image
My Image
My Image
Surprised but Pleased
Growing up in Arkansas my grandmother taught me to call a spade a spade -- she liked to play poker – but her intention was to remind me that you always tell the truth even when it hurts. This is a reference to her practice of requiring me to select my own switch from her yard when I did something bad. Well that’s the way I feel about President Trump this morning. I have been dumping on him for months, complaining about everything he did and said.
 
Last night the President surprised me. I don’t know if the strategy he has laid out for South Asia will work. Knocking down a hornets’ nest in Pakistan might certainly sting us more than the strategy anticipates. But it was a bold move, and may turn out to be one of the necessary steps in achieving some forward movement. I would certainly like to be a fly on the wall in Islamabad about now. I’ve got my fingers crossed.
 
Especially important to me was the part of the presentation when President Trump admitted his instincts had been wrong on Afghanistan. As best as I can tell it is the first time he has done something like that on anything. Some may label it a flip flop, but I disagree. His admission suggests to me that he has accepted that he can’t do it all himself. He needs help. I also see hints that he has begun to realize there is a limit on how much he can delegate to others. Anything requiring a change of direction -- in this case a strategy, can only be made by the President. That’s not micromanaging. It is what Presidents do. They set goals and objectives. Subordinates prepare a detailed plan requiring Presidential approval. Trying to tell the experts how to implement the details is where the micromanaging comes in.
 
It was also the first change in direction that signaled an orderly national security policy existed in this White House. I think we have General Kelly, the National Security Advisor, and the Secretary of Defense to thank. Kudos to all. Past history suggests for them this may rank as one of their greatest accomplishments. I’m especially pleased that the President listened to the people around him who know what they are doing. Now, if he would only give the State Department something to do, we would be getting closer to a return to a normal way of formulating national security policy. Good.
 
Just saying.
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